Wells Fargo said that current reviews found that bank employees had failed to “strictly adhere” to its required procedures during a final step in its documentation processes. It also acknowledged that “some aspects of the notarization process” had not always been properly followed, creating the potential for paperwork errors.

 
After several weeks of insisting its foreclosure processes were sound, Wells Fargo & Company said on Wednesday that it planned to correct and resubmit up to 55,000 improperly filed documents by mid-November.
 
Wells Fargo said that current reviews found that bank employees had failed to “strictly adhere” to its required procedures during a final step in its documentation processes. It also acknowledged that “some aspects of the notarization process” had not always been properly followed, creating the potential for paperwork errors.
 
Wells officials said that the bank started to correct the 55,000 questionable files, and “out of an abundance of caution,” planned to resubmit them in 23 states where foreclosures require court approval. Bank officials maintained that the underlying information in the loan files was accurate and that the bank had not improperly foreclosed on any troubled homeowners.
 
Wells Fargo also said that it had no plans to temporarily freeze foreclosure sales, an action previously taken by its rivals Bank of America and GMAC.
 
Still, the revelations that Wells had identified as many as 55,000 improper foreclosure files add to the mortgage morass. Attorneys general in all 50 states are conducting a sweeping investigation into the industry’s practices, while a White House task force and several federal regulators have embarked on similar reviews.
 
In addition to Wells Fargo, four other large mortgage players are resubmitting tens of thousands of cases in large swaths of the country. Chase said it was looking at about 115,000 files in 41 states. Bank of America is looking at 102,000 in 23 states, where foreclosures require court approval. GMAC and PNC Financial have come forward to say they are resubmitting files with improper paperwork, too.
 
Still, Wells Fargo’s announcement was the second time a bank had backtracked on statements it had made about the extent of its foreclosure problems. After weeks of insisting that its review had not turned up any serious errors, Bank of America acknowledged a number of paperwork errors, including incorrect data and misspelled names.
 
Wells Fargo had previously taken an even more combative stance. In its Oct. 20 conference call with investors, bank officials said they were confident that the foreclosure processes and controls were sound. That statement gave the impression that there were few if any problems but left room for the possibility that the bank might have to fix a small number of mistakes.
 
During the conference call, Wells officials dismissed concerns that the bank had systematically engaged in so-called robo-signing, where a single employee would sign thousands of loan documents without verifying their contents, as the law requires. Instead, the bank emphasized that their policies called for the same employee who compiled the foreclosure file to sign off on it — a crucial legal requirement in many states.
 
But revelations in an obscure Florida lawsuit and elsewhere raised concerns about whether that process was always followed. Under questioning, Xee Moua, a Wells Fargo manager, said she would sign off on as many as 500 foreclosure files a day without verifying the accuracy of their contents. “We don’t go into the details with these affidavits,” she said in a deposition.
 
Oscar Suris, a Wells Fargo spokesman, declined to comment on whether any of the problems the bank identified stemmed from such violations. He previously called Ms. Moua’s testimony “one isolated case” that is being disputed in the courts.
 
Wells officials also acknowledged the possibility of notarization errors. Previously, Wells officials said they believed that their notarization procedures complied with the law in South Carolina, where the bank’s loan foreclosure operations were based. As a result of the reviews, bank officials now say they are taking into consideration the unique requirements of different counties and states.
 
By ERIC DASH
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