Tuesday is THE DAY!

Make sure you VOTE and make your vote count.

You have no room to squawk or complain about anything if you do  not vote.

Good luck to my little brother Denny who is running for 38th District State Representative!  Go Denny!

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Talk Radio 600 WREC Memphis TN

Host: Jo Garnar Mortgage Shoppe

Guests: Holly & Don Swapper, PRESIDENT Memphis Investors Group

Mike Butler

 

60 minute replay

State Supreme Court Rules AGAINST Landlords!

Kentucky Leads The Nation Again!

Right here in Louisville, Kentucky, my hometown, a lawsuit against a landlord has made it all the way to our State Supreme Court resulting in another new case law against landlords. This ruling has spread like wildfire all over the U.S.A.

Here is the short version.

Tenant has a Rottweiler dog in a fenced rear yard. Dog gets out of the yard, runs across the street and attacks a little girl, tearing most of her face off.

Obviously, the girl’s family is tore all to pieces and sues both the tenant and the landlord.

The case ends up in our State Supreme Court and they ruled on this case just a few weeks ago.

In summary, the Kentucky Supreme Court, in their explanation of their ruling, sided with the girl’s family giving major consideration of who has the deep pockets. The court acknowledged most tenants do not have piles of cash and remarked the only opportunity for recourse for the little girl’s family would be the landlord.

As a result of their ruling a new “case law” was created making the landlord the true owner of any animal on the rental property, with or without the landlord’s permission. Don’t shoot me, I am the messenger.

FYI, because the dog escaped the fenced rear yard, the State Supreme Court ruled the landlord was not responsible for the animal when it is not on the rented property and ruled in favor of the landlord on this case because the dog was not on the property.

My concern is your insurance companies across America will jump on this bandwagon just like environmental hazards.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO? I immediately created… Click Here for Full Video/Article (Members Only)

FHFA Streamlines Short Sale Standards for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac

The program attempts to remove barriers created by some subordinate lien holders by limiting subordinate-lien payments to $6,000. This maneuver essentially cuts off any attempts by second-lien holders to negotiate for larger payoff amounts.

New short sale requirements for servicers proposed by the Federal Housing Finance Agency are giving financial firms a battle strategy for dealing with reluctant subordinate-lien holders who attempt to delay short sales on points of negotiation.

Some parties in short sales are able to delay the process by Click Here for Full Video/Article (Members Only)

Short Video shows you how to find your next great Office Manager

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How To Screen Contractors On The Phone

Short video

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SPECIAL REPORT!

by

Mike Grinnan CPA

 

“Your Inside Scoop on ALL of

Your New Taxes in ObamaCare”

31 Page Special Report from Mike Grinnan CPA

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Raising annual rental license fees was one thing.  But when officials in Columbia, Missouri added yet another regulatory requirement, landlords cried foul.

According to a news report, the Columbia City Council proposed a law which will require landlords to complete an “occupancy disclosure” form at leasing, verifying each occupant, and placing it on file with the city.

Landlords expressed concern that not only would this new requirement be onerous, but it would force them to violate their tenants’ privacy by revealing sensitive information.

Over the past two years, landlords across the country have been slammed with a barrage of government regulatory requirements, from non-smoking disclosures in Oregon, to radon disclosures in Maine, to the most recent voter registration requirement in Madison.  In 2010, Athens, Georgia adopted an “education form” where landlords are required to apprise tenants of their civic duties, including the rules for littering and the city’s occupancy standards. Landlords are challenging that law in court.

City officials in Columbia say that the intent of their proposed disclosure law is to cut down on overcrowding in rental properties.

For landlords, it’s just one more burden that falls on their shoulders, leaving them vulnerable to fines for failing to police the local laws.

The proposal to increase rental licensing fees – nearly doubling them in some situations — was placed on hold pending a study of the city’s actual costs for a rental inspection program, according to the report.

City officials say they will continue to collect comments on the occupancy disclosure form and forward the public input to the City Council.

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