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DATE: Wednesday, Feb 22
TIME: 9pm eastern
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odds are, you already know a family member,
a friend, a fellow worker or church member,
or even an investor who has experienced some
hard knocks in today’s market…. a ding or two on credit

This is the opportunity to discover several,
until now, mostly hidden strategies to not only
increase your credit score in 30 days or less,
but also substantially increase your credit limits.

Learn how you can help others Wednesday nite at 9pm

You will need a good notebook and two good ink pens
for all of the notes on this webinar.

Oh yeah, at the end, we will be answering all of
your questions.

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To Your Continued $uccess!

Mike Butler

I Could Not Believe It.

Is This Really True?

It Is In The Planning Stages Now

The Federal Transaction Tax!

President Obama’s finance team and Nancy Pelosi are recommending a 1% transaction tax on all financial transactions.

It is true.

The bill is HR-4646 introduced by US Rep Peter deFazio D-Oregon and US Senator Tom Harkin D-Iowa.

Their plan is to sneak it in after the November election to keep it under the radar.
See what Nancy has to say about this wonderful idea!  http://tinyurl.com/24dn5ud

It’s only 1%! This is a 1% tax on all transactions to or from any financial institution i.e. Banks, Credit Unions, Mutual funds, Brokers, etc.

Any deposit you make will have a 1% tax charged.

Any withdrawal you make, 1% tax.

Any transfer within your account, a transfer to or from savings and checking, will have a 1% tax charged.

Any ATM transaction, withdrawal or deposit, 1% tax.

If your pay check or your Social Security is direct deposited, 1% tax.

If you carry a check to your bank to deposit, 1% tax.

If you take cash in to deposit, 1% tax.

If you receive any income from a bond or a dividend from stock, 1% tax.

Any Real Estate Transaction, 1% tax.

This is from the man who promised that if you make under $250,000 per year, you will not see one penny of new tax! Remember, he is completely honest and trustworthy.
Keep your eyes and ears open.

Folks, Nancy says this would be a minimal tax on the people, but 1 percent every time you pay a bill or make a deposit is not minimal. This would no doubt tax investment transactions as well as bank account transactions.

Excerpt from American Debt Relief

Contact Your U.S. Representative AND U.S. Senator Now

Here is the Link for fill-in-the-blank email to Your U.S. Representative

https://writerep.house.gov/writerep/welcome.shtml

 


 

 

December 12th, 2011

The FHA has established minimum credit score requirements in order to be eligible for FHA financing.

The FHA guidelines specifically exclude from eligibility any borrower with a FICO score below 500.  Theoretically, any borrower with a credit score above 500 can be approved for an FHA loan but realistically, the lower the credit score, the more difficult it becomes to actually obtain FHA loan approval.

Borrowers with a FICO score between 500 to 579 are eligible for FHA-insured mortgage financing but are required to make a 10% downpayment and be able to verify sufficient income.  There are actually very few borrowers that wind up obtaining an FHA mortgage under these requirements.  A low credit score is indicative of a high level of mismatch between a borrower’s debt obligations and income, resulting in late or defaulted loan payments.  Under these circumstances, it is highly unlikely that a potential borrower would be able to accumulate a 10% downpayment.

Borrowers with credit scores above 580 are eligible for maximum FHA financing and are required to make only a 3.5% downpayment.  From a practical standpoint, however, it has become extremely difficult to obtain FHA loan approval unless the borrower’s credit score is above 620.  This is due to the fact that FHA lenders have established their own credit criteria for loan approval which exceeds the FHA guidelines.  Most of the largest banks that make mortgage loans under the FHA lending program require a minimum FICO score of 640.

The FHA and the banking industry have dramatically tightened underwriting criteria for loan approval due to the collapse of housing values and the large number of mortgage defaults. A borrower applying for an FHA mortgage today with a FICO score below 620 has a very low chance of being approved.

At the peak of the housing bubble in 2007, a huge 45% of FHA loans were approved for borrowers with credit scores below 620.  In 2008, the number declined to 33%, in 2009 to 14% and in 2010 to only 4%.  The number of borrowers approved for FHA insured mortgage loans with a credit score below 620 declined to 3% in 2011.

Borrowers with a credit score above 660 have the best chance of being approved for FHA financing as can be seen in the graph below.  In 2011, 70% of all FHA mortgage loans were given to borrowers with a credit score of 660 or higher.

 

from FHA website

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Gold Member Roger Taylor emailed me this article in the New York Times.

This is huge and will greatly affect the real estate market across America.

Chew on this a bit, not only will this slow down and halt foreclosures creating a massive stockpile of defaults, but there will also be many other critical issues for both homeowners and investors alike.

For Example:

Title Companies will stop writing title insurance. Old Republic has already announced it will not insure any properties having a GMAC mortgage.

Investors and Homeowners alike, who have already purchased "bank owned" real estate or HUD properties, may find themselves with a toxic property because it may have an unmarketable title due to all of the huge lenders and law firms having openly admitted falsifying documents during the foreclosure process.

Homeowners in default, by the masses, will be filing all kinds of action demanding lenders produce all of the original and real documents involving their mortgage. Keep in mind, a California bankruptcy court has already ruled that "MERS" is NOT sufficient proof of ownership of notes and mortgages. In other words, the lender who claims to own the note and mortgage, must be able to produce the original promissory note and documents. (Notes and mortgages were sliced, diced, and chopped up and sold on the secondary market using MERS without any concern for the physical documents themselves. 

Stay Tuned…

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Bank of America to Freeze Foreclosure Cases

By DAVID STREITFELD
Published: October 1, 2010 in NYT
 
Bank of America, the country’s largest mortgage lender by assets, said on Friday that it was reviewing documents in all foreclosure cases now in court to evaluate if there were errors.
 
It is the third major lender in the last two weeks to freeze foreclosures in the 23 states where the process is controlled by courts.
 
But Bank of America went further than the first two lenders, GMAC Mortgage and JPMorgan Chase, which have said they will amend paperwork only in cases they think were improperly done. So far, that has amounted to only a handful of cases.
 
Bank of America, in an e-mailed statement, said it would “amend all affidavits in foreclosure cases that have not yet gone to judgment.”
 
That could mean tens of thousands of foreclosure cases would be in limbo for months or, if the consumers in default hire lawyers, years.
 
Spokesmen for the bank said that they were uncertain how many cases the lender currently had in court. They provided no timeline or explanation for the freeze, saying only that the bank planned to eventually resubmit all the cases.
 
The moratorium is likely to further fuel the uproar over the foreclosure tactics of the big lenders, which continued to have political ramifications on Friday.
 
Before Bank of America’s announcement, Richard Blumenthal, the Connecticut attorney general, asked judges in his state to put a halt to all foreclosures for 60 days. Connecticut is one of the 23 states where foreclosure is a judicial matter. Others include Illinois, Florida, New Jersey and New York.
 
Mr. Blumenthal, who is running for senator in Connecticut, said the freeze “should stop a foreclosure steamroller based on defective documents and enable effective remedies.”
 
California’s attorney general, Jerry Brown, said that Chase should stop any foreclosures in the state until it proved that it was following the law. Mr. Brown, who is a candidate for governor, earlier made the same demand of GMAC.
 
In California, lenders generally pursue foreclosures outside of the court system, so they are presumably still proceeding with evictions. Chase declined to say whether it would comply with Mr. Brown’s comments.
 
Chase said this week that it had frozen 56,000 foreclosure cases. GMAC, which is largely owned by the Treasury after receiving $17 billion in federal bailout money to prevent its collapse, has repeatedly declined to say how many cases it is halting.
 
The nation’s two other major lenders, Citi and Wells Fargo, have issued statements maintaining they have no problems with their cases.
 
The problem for all the lenders that have announced moratoriums stems directly from their attempt to deal with an unprecedented number of foreclosures.
 
According to LPS Applied Analytics, a mortgage data firm, 2 million households are in foreclosure. Another 2.37 million households are seriously delinquent and waiting for their lender to take action.
 
Sometimes these loans are still owned by the lender but often, the banks are merely the loan servicer acting on behalf of the owner. Many of the loans are owned by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the mortgage holding companies now controlled by the Treasury. In other cases the loans have been sold to private investment pools.
 
Confronted with so many cases, the lenders tried to process them on a wholesale basis, with the goal of avoiding the expense of a full trial and instead getting summary judgments.
 
The tool for doing this was the so-called robo-signers, in which midlevel bank executives would sign thousands of affidavits a month attesting that they had personal knowledge that the facts of the case were as presented. The affidavits were prepared by lawyers who were paid a flat fee, which also placed a premium on volume.
 
When defense lawyers started deposing these robo-signers, they acknowledged that they could not possibly have knowledge of all the cases. The banks say this is a technicality and they will refile the proper affidavits. The defense lawyers say the practice calls the cases, and indeed the entire process, into question.
 
Thomas Lawler, a housing economist, said the current mess was predictable and probably inevitable. Lenders made their money by making loans and then simply and efficiently servicing them by collecting the checks every month. They were never prepared to deal with the labor-intensive problems of delinquency and foreclosure.
 
“However, the foreclosure crisis is now almost three years old, and not having staffed up sufficiently to deal with the problems with inadequate staffing borders on criminal,” Mr. Lawler said. “I mean, jeepers, look at the unemployment rate; how hard would it have been to hire more folks?”
 
Mark Stopa, a Florida lawyer who represents defaulting homeowners, said the magnitude of the current troubles depends on how title insurance companies react. If those firms begin to shy away from insuring foreclosed properties because they think those properties are vulnerable to claims, he said, the entire housing market could suffer.
 
“Judges have to force banks to do foreclosures correctly,” Mr. Stopa said. But he noted that would require a significant increase in staff. “I’ll believe it when I see it,” he said.
 
Stocks of the major title insurance companies dropped on Friday amid concern that their business would suffer as a result of the foreclosure freezes. Fidelity National Financial fell more than 4 percent, while First American Financial dropped 3 percent.
 
One firm, Old Republic National Title, said this week it would not issue policies on GMAC foreclosures until further notice.

 

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Approving Process Rental Applications Part 2
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How to Screen Tenants from A to Z 

 

 

 

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